Quick Answer: How Does Lyme Disease Affect The Nervous System?

Does Lyme disease attack the nervous system?

In about 15 percent of cases, Lyme disease affects the central nervous system.

When it does, it is known as neurologic Lyme disease.

Sometimes, people who think they may have Lyme disease find out they have MS (an immune-mediated central nervous system disorder)..

What does a Lyme disease flare up feel like?

Additional symptoms that may occur with Lyme disease include: an initial rash that may appear as a bull’s eye. flu-like symptoms, including fever, chills, body aches, and headache. joint pain.

Can Lyme affect your brain?

Lyme disease can affect the lining of the brain, a disorder known as meningitis. Other than causing fever and bad headaches, this form of meningitis is remarkably benign; nobody has ever died of it, and it has rarely — if ever — caused significant damage to any patient’s brain.

Is memory loss from Lyme disease permanent?

Short-term memory loss, confusion, brain fog, and word repetition are just a few symptoms of Lyme brain experienced by many Lyme patients.

How do you know if you have chronic Lyme disease?

Chronic Lyme survivors have reported experiencing the following symptoms for months to years after infection: Intermittent fevers, chills, and sweats. Chronic inflammation. Roving aches and stiffness.

Can nerve damage from Lyme disease be reversed?

Damaged nerves take time to recover, and patients may continue to remain symptomatic for weeks to a few months after antibiotic treatment. “You can have prolonged symptoms even if the bug is eradicated,” Weinstein said. “The nervous system, like some other systems, heals slowly. Or there may permanent damage.

Can Lyme disease turn into MS?

Lyme disease is unlikely to be a significant factor in the differential diagnosis of MS.” Furthermore, the presence or antibodies to Borrelia does not prove that Borrelia is causing the neurological symptoms, only that there has been previous infection with the organism.

Does Lyme disease stay in your body forever?

If treated, Lyme disease does not last for years. However, for some people, the after-effects of the disease can linger for months and sometimes even years.

Can late stage Lyme be treated?

Can doctors treat late-stage Lyme disease? If the bacteria that causes Lyme disease has spread to your central nervous system, you can still be treated with antibiotics. You’ll get that medicine by IV, or directly into a vein. This allows it to go right into your bloodstream and start working.

How does Lyme disease affect the central nervous system?

Lyme disease may affect the central nervous system causing organic brain disease or syndromes suggestive of demyelination.

What body system does Lyme disease affect?

Lyme disease can affect different body systems, such as the nervous system, joints, skin, and heart. The symptoms of Lyme disease are often described as happening in three stages.

What are the symptoms of neurological Lyme disease?

What are the symptoms? Neurological complications most often occur in early disseminated Lyme disease, with numbness, pain, weakness, facial palsy/droop (paralysis of the facial muscles), visual disturbances, and meningitis symptoms such as fever, stiff neck, and severe headache.

What are the 3 stages of Lyme disease?

Although Lyme disease is commonly divided into three stages — early localized, early disseminated, and late disseminated — symptoms can overlap. Some people will also present in a later stage of disease without having symptoms of earlier disease.

What kind of heart problems does Lyme disease cause?

The bacteria hinders your heart’s electrical system, as it enters the heart tissue and can interfere with electrical signals, causing a condition called heart block. Symptoms of Lyme carditis include lightheadedness, fainting, heart palpitations, chest pains, and shortness of breath.

What are the symptoms of late stage Lyme disease?

Late persistent Lyme diseaseArthritis that most often affects the knee. … Numbness and tingling in the hands, feet, or back.Feeling very tired.Not being able to control the muscles of the face.Problems with memory, mood, or sleep, and sometimes problems speaking.More items…